Track fossil-fuel subsidies and other support measures with our interactive database

The Fossil Fuel Subsidy Tracker is a collaboration between the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD).

Global estimates on subsidies to fossil fuels

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Disclaimer: Any data and any map included herein are without prejudice to the status of or sovereignty over any territory, to the delimitation of international frontiers and boundaries and to the name of any territory, city or area. Global dataset across 192 economies available till 2020.

Global estimates by fuel type

Sources:

Disclaimer: Any data and any map included herein are without prejudice to the status of or sovereignty over any territory, to the delimitation of international frontiers and boundaries and to the name of any territory, city or area.

We address the fossil fuel subsidy knowledge gap

The United Nations General Assembly adopted a global indicator framework to help monitor progress against the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in July 2017. SDG 12, “Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns”, includes a target to “rationalise inefficient fossil-fuel subsidies that encourage wasteful consumption” as an important building block to achieving its vision. Country reporting against related SDG indicator 12.c.1, “Amount of fossil-fuel subsidies per unit of GDP (production and consumption)”, will start in 2021 with the launch of an “SDG 12 hub” web platform, but will likely take several years to ramp up.

International estimates of subsidies for fossil-fuel production and consumption can bridge the gap in the transition to full implementation of country reporting and help enhance comparability of national data. The Fossil Fuel Subsidy Tracker brings together in a single platform estimates from the major international organisations producing data on support for fossil fuels, to provide a user-friendly way to track subsidies for producers and consumers around the world, from both a global and an individual country perspective.

The data included is provided by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the International Energy Agency (IEA), and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). For more information, see our “About” section.

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